LIVE: Kate Nash @ The Sugarmill, Stoke-on-Trent (20/03/2011)

Date: March 20th, 2011
Venue: The Sugarmill, Stoke-on-Trent
Support: Brigitte Aphrodite
Website: www.katenash.co.uk
MySpace: www.myspace.com/katenashmusic

Rating:

Following the huge mainstream success of her debut ‘Made Of Bricks’, 2010’s follow-up ‘My Best Friend Is You’ only marginally compared with its achievements on a commercial level. The traditional Kate Nash style never left though, and on the run up of shows before working upon her third record, the 23-year-old indie-pop songstress is hitting many smaller venues, including The Sugarmill in Stoke, to show she hasn’t disappeared anywhere.

First and only supporting act Brigitte Aphrodite (***) is a radical girl onstage, often looking like the music has morphed her into a whole new situation like a character of a story and acts sporadically upon it. Debut single ‘Happening’ and ‘Streets Of Bromley’ expose some of Brigitte‘s more catchier numbers, whereas the likes of ‘Ms. Hedonistic’ brings out the young sister to be alike to a slightly kookier cousin of Kate Nash.

Starting her first night of the current tour in Stoke could’ve gone either way, but with the show selling out in a matter of a few short days, Kate Nash (****) could have done very little better than she did. Starting off with ‘I Just Love You More’, this was the beginning moment of what could be the biggest crowd reaction for the whole tour, most notably with the set’s quietest inclusion ‘I Hate Seagulls’, in which Kate struggles for a few minutes to begin the song due to the crowds screams of enjoyment. The remainder of the show continues on much the same, with her balance of songs taken across both albums, from the pop sensations ‘Do-Wah-Doo’ and ‘Foundations’ to the more piano-driven ‘Later On’ and ‘Mouthwash’. The liveliness of the London-grown singer is also pleasantly surprising, and couldn’t be said more for when she clambers and stands atop her keyboard at the end of set closer, ‘Pumpkin Soup’. Rest assured, Kate Nash hasn’t faded away just yet.

Written by Zach Redrup