ALBUM: Visigoth – The Revenant King

Release Date: January 27th 2015
Label: Metal Blade Records
Website: None available
Facebook: www.facebook.com/visigothofficial
Twitter: None available

Rating:

Some may see Visigoth as pioneers; five daring brothers taking metal back to its glorious, fire-breathing, leather boot-stomping, denim clad roots. When everyone else is trying to be something new, Visigoth violently slammed on the brakes, hit reverse, and ventured backwards in time with ‘The Revenant King’ to make some good-old fashioned head-banging, devil-horned 80s power metal.

However, their lyrics are heavily focussed around medieval themes with tales of kings, dungeons and the river Styx meaning that, without realising it, Visigoth may well have ventured into the bland-as-fuck, near indistinguishable land of folk metal. Oh, sure, you can split greasy, unwashed hairs between pirate metal, Viking metal, goblin metal, anvil metal, dragon metal, (insert medieval word) metal, but it all essentially falls under the same weird umbrella where every band sounds exactly the fucking same.

Nevertheless, Visigoth are talented. Stupidly talented infact. The penmanship of the lyrics, boldly executed by Jake Rogers, the wizard-like guitar riffery of Leeland Campana, Jamison Palmer and Matt Brotherton alongside the relentless drumming of Mikey T.; it’s all truly commendable.

Traditional metal or folk metal, whatever Visigoth set out to create they’ve accomplished almost too well. You see, the issue with looking backwards is that it’s all been done before, so you run the risk of making an album that is predictable and, in most cases, boring. Tragically, Visigoth have fallen into that fatal trap, and produced an album that fades into background noise after a handful of tracks.

Every song on ‘The Revenant King’ follows the same exact formula; intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, guitar-wankery, secondary palm-muting bridge, chorus, end. Copy-and-pasted over nine tracks and drawn out for a full punishing hour, only a devout yet foolhardy metal-fan could venture through this tedious, predictable Bloodstock-fodder.

Written by Andy Roberts (@Sassensquatch)