ALBUM: The Thomas Nicholas Band – Security

Release Date: May 25th 2015
Label: Unsigned
Website: www.tinband.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/tinband
Twitter: www.twitter.com/tinband

Rating:

Known best for his portrayal as Kevin in the notoriously funny American Pie series, actor Thomas Nicholas appears to have put acting on the back burner a little bit to focus on his recent project, The Thomas Nicholas Band. His latest full-length ‘Security’, however, suffers from a lack of identity and is littered with lyrical clichés.

Following completion in Spring 2014, the LP was toured extensively with three runs across the midwest and two in the UK. This lead to a PledgeMusic campaign, whereby fans funded the project in exchange for a profuse amount of exclusives. With a clearly devoted fan base pumping their own money into the project, it’s a great shame that ‘Security’ fails to rise above mediocrity.

One of the album’s biggest flaws is that it struggles to stand out and lacks personality. Tracks like ‘Old School’ and ‘It’s Over’ could be convincingly passed off as any other indie-pop outfit and are extremely forgettable. ‘Terrified’, although not necessarily the album’s worst offering, sounds painful similar to The Killers hit ‘When You Were Young’, adopting its very prominent chord progression.

Another one of ‘Security’‘s flaws is that many tracks feel extremely long winded, recycling hooks and diminishing their overall impact. Although ‘Disaster’ is one of the LP’s finer moments, its initial hold on the listener is compromised by how inanely repetitive it is.

Thankfully, the record does have its fair share of redeeming qualities. Opener, ‘The Bet’, is an undeniably catchy sun drenched anthem, demonstrating the height of the band’s ability. Later track, ‘Lose’, shines through its self-deprecating lyrics and melancholic tone, offering a much needed contrast.

‘Security’ presents itself as quite a disappointing and forgettable experience, one which has been eagerly anticipated by fans for the last five years. Although it holds its fair share of highlights, they are soon eclipsed by the vast number of monotonous and underwhelming moments.

Written by Kieran Harris