ALBUM REVIEW: Year Of The Knife – Internal Incarceration

Release Date: August 7th 2020
Label: Pure Noise Records
Website: www.yearoftheknife.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/yearoftheknife
Twitter: www.twitter.com/yearoftheknife

Rating:

Year Of The Knife‘s debut record, ‘Internal Incarceration’, is exactly as heavy as the title suggests.

Hardcore is an easily dismissed genre these days cause og its lack of diversity, which has obviously not gone unnoticed by newer bands coming into it. Luckily so, Year Of The Knife are one of them. Intro track ‘This Time’ instantly sets the tone from the very first note on: heavy riffs, aggressive vocals, screeching guitars. Stank-face imminent.

Every track is filled with an endless amount of energy from front-to-back, with equal amounts of glimpses of death metal (peeping through on ‘Virtual Narcotics’, for example), and punk, as heard on ‘Stay Away’. The latter features an awfully appropriate chant of “Stay the fuck away from me”, which makes it an incredibly great choice to be played very loudly anywhere you go these days to reinforce some of that social distancing.

Another piece of lyrical gold can be found on ‘Manipulation Artist’ with “If I’m going down, you’re going down with me”, which, in this case, describes a toxic relationship, but is also what it generally feels like in society these days. Everyone is only looking out for themselves, successes are their own, but if something goes wrong and they fail, people intend to take others down with them, unable to accept anyone have it better than them. Simple words, big impact.

‘Final Tears’ has some of the most inspired bass lines, guitar work, and drum parts on the whole record, and especially puts the sheer quality of production present on this record into a spotlight. Every aspect of the song is able to somehow be in the foreground but simultaneously gives space for everything else, which is outrageously important for the end of this song as it grows into something so much bigger than it started out as.

Having this much musical diversity, lyrical intensity, and good ol’ hardcore anger packed into a debut album is refreshing. ‘Internal Incarceration’ sets Year Of The Knife up for a very bright future.