ALBUM REVIEW: The Offspring – Let The Bad Times Roll

Release Date: April 16th 2021
Label: Concord Records
Website: www.offspring.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/offspring
Twitter: www.twitter.com/offspring

Rating:

The Offspring are close to celebrating their 40th anniversary, having been a band since the early 80s, and they’re still rocking hard with their tenth studio album, ‘Let The Bad Times Roll’.

This is their first album to feature their new bassist, Todd Morse, following the departure of Greg K. in 2018, and is also their first album in nine years, acting as the follow-up to 2012’s ‘Days Gone’.

The band open this up with the gusto we’ve come to expect on ‘This Is Not Utopia’, with the funky yet energetic drum groove from Pete Parada at the start of the verses segueing into classic punk madness for the remainder of the verse until the arena-pleasing chorus hits. The classic The Offspring formula is at play on this track, and it works beautifully.

Other highlights include the title-track, which sounds almost like a punk version of Outkast‘s hit single ‘Hey Ya!’ in places, and ‘Army Of One’, which just exudes classic punk energy. ‘We Never Have Sex Anymore’ is also worth a mention for its odd mixture of funk, punk, and ska that you just can’t help but smile and bop along to.

Frontman Dexter Holland‘s punk arrangement of Edvard Grieg‘s orchestral epic ‘In The Hall Of The Mountain King’ is an odd choice for a track, but it works surprisingly well. The suspense of the original composition is kept, and actually lends itself to punk with ease.

The penultimate number is a piano version of their 1997 classic single, ‘Gone Away’. and whilst the original was already emotionally heavy, but reworking only amps that up further. It will be a challenge to anybody, no matter how tough they think they are, to still have dry eyes by the end of the song.

‘Let The Bad Times Roll’ has evidently been a long time coming, but equipped with arena-ready choruses they’re priming to make up for lost time once touring is a thing again. The Offspring may have been around for almost forty years, but ‘Let The Bad Times Roll’ proves that they’ve still got plenty of power left in their cannon yet.