ALBUM REVIEW: Sydney Sprague – Maybe I Will See You At The End Of The World

Release Date: February 26th 2021
Label: Rude Records
Website: www.sydneysprague.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/sydneysprague
Twitter: www.twitter.com/sydneysprague

Rating:

A songwriter since childhood, it must feel to Sydney Sprague that her debut album has been a long time coming. ‘Maybe I Will See You At The End Of The World’ is the first time that Sprague has been able to flex her singer/songwriter muscles for a full-length record, and, with it, she finds maturity, refinement, and sophistication.

Citing inspiration from the likes of 90s and 00s pop-rock heroins, it makes sense that Sydney Sprague shakes up her gentle acoustic numbers with surprising bursts of pop-infused energy. ‘Steve’, for example, is robust with the potential to be a summer hit on radio stations across the pond – and here in the UK, if people catch on. The track hints at Sprague‘s predecessors (Avril Lavigne, Kelly Clarkson, The Veronicas), but with a more subtle, mature approach.

Similarly, with ‘Staircase Failure’, we’re treated to the same gritty, sour tone as the queen of angst, Alanis Morissette. However, Sprague‘s version is more passive-aggressive than an all-out slanging match, which will undoubtedly work in her favour.

The most impressive trick Sprague spins in ‘Maybe I Will See You At The End Of The World’ is creating honest, authentic relationships between herself and the listener. ‘You Have To Stop’ is the first time this really resonates; the track feels as though it comes from an incredibly intimate place, and, as Sprague opens herself, she creates space for a moment to be shared solely between herself and the listener. This continues, in truth, for the rest of the album; from the subtle, simple ‘Wrongo’ to the understated yet emotive ‘Quitter’, Sprague‘s style, lyrics, and vocals all come together in the loveliest of ways.

It feels like there’s still so much untapped potential lurking beneath the surface with Sydney Sprague, which is a truly exciting thought, but, thankfully, the heart of ‘Maybe I Will See You At The End Of The World’ is all there.