ALBUM REVIEW: Sullii – Me And My Absent Mind

Release Date: April 10th 2020
Label: LONE
Website: None available
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Twitter: www.twitter.com/lonesull

Rating:

Hung head and cross-legged, Sullii (aka Josh Rogers of Crooks) delivers his second album, ‘Me And My Absent Mind’, a lo-fi anthology of sickly-spirited tracks.

There’s nothing particularly complex about this effort, but its elementary depictions prove straight and narrow, cutting straight down to the core.

‘Never’ is up first, splicing melodic hooks with clipped vocal deliveries and punctuative beats. It’s clear that Sullii is aiming for an earworm here, a track that burrows into your brain and sets up camp among melancholic feelings, but the chorus isn’t quite as potent as it could be.

Granted, sometimes a simpler avenue with regard to literary application in music is endearing, but coupled with somewhat bland vocals, the introductory track poses room for more nit-picking than celebration. This is sadly the case throughout the 10-track effort.

In a final offering of dismay, ‘Forgetter’ poses the same melodic outreach to little avail. Repetitive and predictable, the more tuneful elements of this release are dull and disappointing. It’s as though Sullii has clutched at the muted pinks and greys of solemnity, and, rather than allowing them to bloom, they’ve been squeezed lifeless into each strain of ‘Me And My Absent Mind’.

It’s in the grittier pipes of the feat that the lyricist’s complexities grovel with greater effect. ‘True’ is fresher, and less blotted with static beats and distracting amenities. Each strand of the track is tasteful and its content is more potent, as straying from strategic conformity in terms of ‘catchy’ melodic hooks clearly works in Sullii‘s favour.

‘Slides’ is a standalone track of purity among its siblings’ confusion. Stripped back and lucid, the simplicity in the vocals here is resonant, like the words that Sullii is painting here are visible, free from chaotic scratchings of electronic undertones. ‘Absent Mind’ is similar, this time with crisp, lo-fi influences knotting samples and beats nicely into strictly melancholic words.

If the visual and stylistic aesthetic of a release is integral to your enjoyment, then ‘Me And My Absent Mind’ will satiate you just fine. Its candid approach, while diluted in its intricacy, only emphasises relatability to those with tastes in this field.