ALBUM REVIEW: Sevendust – Blood & Stone

Release Date: October 23rd 2020
Label: Rise Records
Website: www.sevendust.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/sevendustofficial
Twitter: www.twitter.com/sevendust

Rating:

With over twenty-five years in the game, Sevendust have a wealth of experience under their belts, meaning they have plenty under their arsenal to inject into their thirteenth album, ‘Blood & Stone’.

Hurtling into a straight up assault of metalcore, ‘Dying To Live’ bounds with enthusiastic rhythms and blaring clean vocals from Lajon Witherspoon, who commands a spectre of shouts to deliver not just a gut punch of lyrics, but a euphoria of uplifting choruses that speak of self conflict and resolution.

Dialling up the ferocity, ‘Blood From A Stone’ blasts with diving riffs and stop-start confrontational drops that give an extra aggressive edge that is at times missing from the clean vocal work and could do with variation across the board.

Taking on an ethereal approach, ‘Kill Me’ starts with ominous synths and acoustic instruments that could lead into a curious adventure into different genres. Yet, everything is reigned into a safe formula of cleans that have an aggressive background of riffs from Clint Lowery and John Connolly, who must be champing at the bit to launch into a full tirade of confrontational riffs and blasting roars of strings.

Turning to rock ‘n’ roll realms, ‘Nothing Left To See Here Anymore’ lets an ominous figure infiltrate the forefront with distant guitar strings. They’re juxtaposed against dramatic choruses that make for a great blending of modern and classic stylings that show how creative the band can be with genres.

Attempting to end on a high point, ‘The Day I Tried To Live’ is perfect for a verse of Christian rock and does reach the point of euphoria during the choruses, but becomes lacklustre across the whole make it into the truly masterful fusion it could be.

As long as Sevendust have been around, you might think there could have been an endeavour to branch out and explore some different avenues. Yet nothing seems to have moved on except time itself in Sevendust‘s case.