ALBUM REVIEW: Dayseeker – Sleeptalk

Release Date: September 27th 2019
Label: Spinefarm Records
Website: www.dayseekerband.co
Facebook: www.facebook.com/dayseeker
Twitter: www.twitter.com/dayseekerband

Rating:

California’s Dayseeker breathe some much needed fresh air into the post-hardcore scene with their fourth LP, ‘Sleeptalk’, and here’s why.

It’s easy to dismiss bands in this certain genre for branching out into more pop, melodic, and synth sounds, as it happened even to the biggest ones in the game. But Dayseeker already had signs of that on 2017’s ‘Dreaming Is Sinking /// Walking Is Rising’, easing fans into this new chapter. Now they’re exploring this further, and they’re doing it with class.

Vocalist Rory Rodriguez manages to experiment with his voice without slipping into the cliché of pairing ultra heavy screams with overly clean vocals. While his voice grows more powerful on the heavier cuts, such as ‘The Color Black’ (a definite standout on the record), it doesn’t tip over into the usual metalcore screams, but none the less intense, giving the song the sound and edge it needs.

Dayseeker have always been compared to bands like Periphery, with their almost mathcore-like riffs, something that’s prominently present in ‘Crooked Soul’. Now they even manage to create such dooming sounds with them that at times they’re bordering on sounding like British metalcore darlings Architects. The guitars and drums align perfectly to create an emotional undertone for the relatively mellow and moody atmosphere that the synths and electronic elements build.

The record is one smooth listen, as it transcends from the calm intro of ‘Drunk’ all the way to the more harrowing end of ‘Crash And Burn’. The only points to criticise are that some songs do sound a bit too alike, and therefore lack in creativity. The instrumental interlude, ‘The Embers Glow’, seems unnecessary and could’ve easily been merged into the beginning of the next song.

Still, Dayseeker are definitely heading into the right direction. Evidently on ‘Sleeptalk’, they’re feeling safe and comfortable in the sound they found and are currently creating, and it only needs some slight refining to peak.