ALBUM REVIEW: Big Cheese – Punishment Park

Release Date: March 6th 2020
Label: Triple B Records/Quality Control HQ Records
Website: None available
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bigcheesehc
Twitter: None available

Rating:

After a series of demos and EPs over recent years, and becoming one of the bigger names to emerge from the Leeds hardcore scene, Big Cheese are here with their debut full-length, ‘Punishment Park’.

Opener ‘Pennine Scrubs’ has a great build-up, with a commanding shout by vocalist Razor Hardwick. The song goes into old school punk and hardcore stylings before the double-time section comes in properly, and will definitely incite mayhem. It’s a very strong opening start, and the energy is kept up all the way thought.

‘IFMB’ makes great use of a bass-driven intro, offering up a little bit of tension before the band’s signature double-time adrenaline sets the scene. It’s clear that the band aren’t intent on wasting time, with none of these songs exceeding the 3-minute mark.

‘Heartbreak Ball’ is perhaps the strongest exhibit of the band’s groove, and this serves as another highlight. Yet, on an album that deals in unapologetic balls-to-the-wall hardcore, there’s still a surprise. The excellently-titled interlude, ‘Tired Children In D Minor’, will keep you on your toes, with an intriguing dialogue playing over a piano motif.

And the album’s title-track is certainly a highlight too, offering up more of the band’s signature groove and a memorable solo. ‘Write Off’ also succeeds on both fronts, you can very much unleash some angst to this, but also lose yourself in the groove this record offers at the same time.

Closing track, ‘Identity’, starts with a highly charged vocal performance, and this has the potential to be a real cornerstone of their career. It then unveils a memorable riff, with more and more reverb appearing on the drums as the song fades to a close.

Big Cheese take no prisoners, but even in this short record there’ll be more than enough to tickle your fancy. You can expect them to be joining their Leeds contemporaries Higher Power in appearing further in the collective consciousness very soon.