ALBUM REVIEW: Bad Rabbits – Mimi

Release Date: August 10th 2018
Label: BAD Records
Website: www.badrabbits.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/badrabbits
Twitter: www.twitter.com/badrabbits

Rating:

For their third album, ‘Mimi’, Boston’s Bad Rabbits have taken a deep plunge into the funk and experimental pop influences from pervious records. This time around, the group have honed their compositional skills as well as showcasing Fredua Boakye‘s vocals to add extra layers of melody.

The short runtime and economic tracklist gives the album a stronger impact, leaving no room for dead space or for re-hashed ideas to be put on display. From ‘Mimi’ to ‘After Party’, the record’s bookend tracks, Bad Rabbits jump from soul, synth pop, lounge to EDM with ease and it’s not at all jarring thanks to the versatility of Boakye‘s performance and the guitar work of Salim Akram.

Tracks such as ‘Dollars And Change’ highlight the dexterity of the group’s hook writing ability with a verse that stays catchy despite the vocals working in compound rhythms. With the verse being so strong, it’s no surprise that the chorus is comprised of double-barrelled hooks, switching focus from the vocal coda to the synth melody with ease.

The bridge continues upon the concept of changing focus by having the guitar riff mimicked by the synth to add a new flavour to the track. The energy is constant thanks to a strong rhythm section keeping the tempo strong but fluid.

The focus on Boakye is most prominent in ‘Eyes On You’ by using a falsetto to anchor the pulsing groove in the chorus. The funk tinged singing on the verse pushes the impact of gliding keyboards, with shades of a tenor range popping through the songs climatic bridge.

Whilst the majority of the album is upbeat and houses a funky bounce, the hypnotic nature of previous release ‘American Nightmare’ is revisited in closer ‘After Party’. The track may be soul based, but the stomping drums and sneaking synth leads reel us in to a sonic dream before abruptly ending.

For a group that’s known for blending genres, it’s refreshing to hear a more sonically concise Bad Rabbits. The underlying melodies on previous releases have come to the forefront on ‘Mimi’, and in doing so have shown their strengths prominently, creating a captivating listen.