ALBUM: Napalm Death – Time Waits For No Slave

Release Date: February 2nd, 2009
Label: Century Media
Website: www.napalmdeath.org
MySpace: www.myspace.com/napalmdeath

Rating:

With the band’s career lasting for about 28 years now, with multiple line-up changes and now 14 studio albums with latest full-length release ‘Time Waits For No Slave’, you’ve got to be thinking that Napalm Death must be losing focus from their game. Recycling old stuff over and over again in their best attempts to create something new would be expected of a band at this stage and status. To an extent this is true, a band lasting this long would be miracle workers if they were able to produce an album without doing so. Regardless, ‘Time Waits For No Slave’ shows Napalm Death as heavy and intense as ever.

We’re thrown right into the audio mosh pit with ‘Strongarm’, a heavy metal/grindcore ridden package, sounding very much like an angry wild badger on both speed and cocaine who’s found some instruments. Infact, that description pretty much fits most of the album, as can be found with the furiousity in ‘Work To Rule’ and ‘Life And Limb’. Despite this repetitive nature though, somehow it gives off a sense of variation within each song that is subtle but apparent, whether it be the underlaying guitar melodicy in ‘Diktat’, or the gothic-like feel of ‘Passive Tense’. There is also, to some very distant extent, a somewhat sing-a-long moment (if you can even call it that) with the repeated chorus line in the track ‘Procrastination On The Empty Vessel’ which will surely be a heavily pushed fan participation track when performed live.

The thing with ‘Time Waits For No Slave’ is that no matter how anger-ridden, and intensely brutal it is throughout, it just seems that recycling old things and doing it all the same with the odd difference here and there isn’t going to cut it forever. But as said earlier, for a description on the overall sound, just think of angry wild badger that’s both speed and cocaine and has stumbled across some instruments.

Written by Zach Redrup