ALBUM: My Passion – Inside This Machine

Release Date: April 25th, 2011
Label: Spinefarm Records
Website: www.mypassion.co.uk
MySpace: www.myspace.com/mypassion

Rating:

The old proverb states, “Do not judge a book by its cover”, but let’s be honest, we all do it. Looking at My Passion, it’s easy to judge. On their debut ‘Corporate Flesh Party’, the Hitchin-based outfit went for the pouting pretty boy look. For sophomore ‘Inside This Machine’ however, they’ve decides to go for a topless, gold body paint image. You may be thinking of many words. However, you can’t see music, so when you actually listen to My Passion, you’ll probably find that they’re actually a great band.

They have the lyrics and vocals of My Chemical Romance, with the chunky mechanical guitar riffs of Rammstein. Intro track ‘Into The Machine’ sounds like something from the Saw horror film franchise, with drills whirring and gunshots in the background, creating a very dark atmosphere. But when the electro-synth kicks in, it chances the vibe completely and sounds like a Prodigy b-side.

‘Inside This Machine’ hosts a decent collection of songs. Take ‘Asleep In The Asylum’ and ‘The Girl Who Lost Her Smile’ for example; they both have a fast, catchy rhythm with heavy yet danceable riffs. Newly recruited drummer Jamie Nicholls keeps things interesting with a forever changing drum beat. At one moment it’s as heavy as an anvil straight on your head from a height of 60ft, and the next it’s complementing a ballad. In fact, the whole band perform outstandingly, from Laurence René‘s soulful croons and screams to John Be‘s and Jonathan Gaskin‘s punk buzz guitars.

However, one big downside to the album is it being a tad generic and repetative, for example ‘Come Back To Me’ and ‘The Guilty Light’ don’t really stand out and sound a lot like most of the other bands out there. Frontman Laurence René (who appears to always doing the ‘Blue Steel’ pose from Zoolander in photoshoots) does have a good metal voice. His metal growls are spot on, but his singing can get a bit warbley in places (in ‘Dance Of Life’ for example), and becomes a little irritating.

‘Inside This Machine’ is a far more matured album from its preceeding debut, and takes you into the machine of an evolved and upgraded My Passion. Although a bit synthesiser heavy and generic in places, there are at least a few songs that will stick with you, but won’t show their true potential until experienced in a live setting. So, before judging them on whatever mental, self-obsessed image you think they may have adopted, take a listen to this record, and I can almost guarantee you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

Written by Andy Roberts