ALBUM: Mayday Parade – Monsters In The Closet

Release Date: October 7th, 2013
Label: Fearless Records
Website: www.maydayparade.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/maydayparade
Twitter: www.twitter.com/mayday_parade

Rating:

Floridian boys Mayday Parade have come a long way from their breakthrough release, ‘A Lesson In Romantics’ back in 2007, including Derek Sanders taking over as lead vocalist. Following up their previous self-titled release with new record, ‘Monsters In The Closet’, the quintet have made an album that not only echoes of their old pop-punk roots, but also shows how they’ve progressed to as a band and where they could head in the future.

Album opener, ‘Ghosts’, is upbeat but relaxed before big number, ‘Girls’, takes the listener back to the Mayday Parade of old, with an incredibly catchy chorus that’ll be rattling around your head for days. The most interesting songs on this record are when the band take a different turn and rely less on infectious hooks. ‘Last Night For A Table For Two’ has great interaction between vocalists Sanders and Jeremy Lenzo, whilst Alex Garcia pulls off a fantastic performance as lead guitarist with an impressive solo that should feature on far more of their songs.

Showing off their softer side, Mayday Parade treat fans to some calmer numbers, including piano-led ‘Even Robots Need Blankets’ and new single ’12 Through 15′, the latter of which crescendos during the final chorus for an impressive vocal performance. Though, most memorable of the mellower tracks is ‘Hold On To Me’, boasting heartfelt lyrics and a powerful, emotional delivery from Sanders making it a brilliant track.

‘Monsters In The Closet’ is a great record, solidifying their base as a pop-punk band but branching out further, flexing their muscles and demonstrating their talent. With huge tracks such as ‘The Torment Of Existence Weighed Against The Horror Of Nonbeing’ promoting their lyrical prowess. Mayday Parade can be proud of this top record, and hopefully people will acknowledge this rather than clinging to the old days of ‘A Lesson In Romantics’.

Written by Jonathon Barlow