ALBUM: Kids In Glass Houses – Peace

Release Date: September 30th, 2013
Label: Transmission Recordings
Website: www.kidsinglasshouses.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/kidsinglasshouses
Twitter: www.twitter.com/kighofficial

Rating:

At some point, somewhere between Kings Of Leon putting out that song about someone’s sex being on fire and You Me At Six doing that tour with Paramore that made people give a shit about them, ‘rock’ music in the UK became engaged in a battle to not only retain it’s soul and credibility, but to do it while still being mindless enough for daytime radio play. Unfortunately, Kids In Glass Houses are losing that battle.

The Welsh quintet’s latest offering, ‘Peace’, is as poppy as pop-rock gets without being Maroon 5 and, while that’s not a bad thing on its own (‘Songs About Jane’ is untouchable and you’re lying to yourself by pretending otherwise), when it’s as bland and hollow as this is, it’s difficult to muster up anything other than apathy towards it. The choruses are as plentiful as they are repetitive, and, while vocalist, Aled Phillips, has a decent voice on him, even he sounds like he doesn’t care enough to utilise it.

For all it’s vacuousness, though, it’s hard to deny that ‘Peace’ offers more than its fair share of catchy melodies. While you might end up hating yourself for it, you’ll be nodding along to the chorus ‘Novocaine’ by its third go around. The musicianship, when it’s actually called upon, isn’t half bad either and there’s enough variation on show to distinguish between tracks, even if that’s still not enough to make the tracks themselves interesting.

It might seem harsh to be so critical of Kids In Glass Houses here, since they don’t try to deny the intentions of their pop leanings, but when you’ve got a song on your album named after the most badass member of the X-Men (Nightcrawler, for those wondering) and it still fails to capture the imagination, you’re doing it wrong and shouldn’t expect any sympathy. Still, you can bet they’ll get a decent amount of radio play out of it.

Written by Ryan De Freitas