ALBUM: Falling In Reverse – The Drug In Me Is You

Release Date: July 26th, 2011
Label: Epitaph Records
Website: www.fallinginreverse.com
MySpace: www.myspace.com/fallinginreversemusic

Rating:

Unceremoniously booted from previous outfit Escape The Fate following a stint in jail, vocalist Ronnie Radke‘s newly formed Falling In Reverse have gone on to moderate success… unsurprisingly by making music indenticle to Escape The Fate. Consequently, debut ‘The Drug In Me Is You’ proves to be an utterly redundant release.

The problems with this album stem from the fact that Falling In Reverse try far too hard. Over produced, cliched and utterly forgettable, the band forego any songwriting prowess in favor of a hackneyed sound that displays their complete lack of versatility.

Indeed, the song structures here are a good indicator of this. Every track follows the tried and tested formula of soaring choruses, the obligatory tired sounding breakdown and the occasional harsh vocal (seemingly shoehorned in almost at random). There are a glut of guitar solos also, yet their presence seem to be solely to demonstrate briefly some instrumental dexterity, yet confusingly with no thought into how it works in the wider scope of the song. The lead in the title track for example, being a ludicrous flurry of notes (there’s no denying the speed is impressive), plays out devoid of any emotional investment or melodic application, two elements fundemental to any guitar solo worth its salt.

Radke‘s voice also quickly becomes an irritant. Although known for his vocal talents, his shrill delivery and constant high register means that, coupled with his inablility to create any truely memorable choruses and some unforgivably appalling lyrics (‘Good Girls, Bad Boys’ is particularly cringeworthy), the vocal department on ‘The Drug In Me Is You’ is altogether lacking.

Falling In Reverse are another, unfortunatley all too common, case of style over substance. Their music comes across as bland and uninspired, despite attempts to mask their mediocrity with studio polish, and ultimately the album is a undistinctive, flavourless and mundane affair.

Written by Tony Bliss