ALBUM: Emmure – Speaker Of The Dead

Release Date: February 15th, 2011
Label: Victory Records
Website: None available
MySpace: www.myspace.com/emmure

Rating:

After their last album, the hit-or-miss ‘Felony’, Emmure had something to prove with their next release. Many fans thought that ‘Felony’ was a step back for the band, and that they were getting on the “no rhythm, just breakdowns” wagon that was plaguing many a metal band, and this was something that made Emmure become a lesser act in the genre and as a result, lose many a fan.

However, the band have risen past the doubters and have really proven their credentials with ‘Speaker Of The Dead’, their newest album. It shows the band taking things to a new level: in terms of heaviness and sheer ferociousness, the band have never reached these heights. The structure of the songs and the lyrics are also a vital part of the machine this time around, whereas before the band didn’t seem to focus on these aspects, but more on how heavy and angry they came across. They didn’t really stand out from the crowd before, and were just another deathcore band, but with this album, Emmure have made sure that everyone knows who they are.

Opener ‘Children Of Cyberton’ has a heavy as hell breakdown all the way through it, which combined with vocalist Frankie Palmeri‘s growling and snarling “How much more proof do you want? / You can’t fuck with us / We are unstoppable” make for an angry song that’s hard not to feel the band’s fury as you listen to it. ‘Dogs Get Put Down’ has pinches that would make Bleeding Through listen in awe and the drumwork in this song is tremendous. Mike Kaabe does an excellent job of taking over the reigns from Joe Lionetti this time around throughout the album. On ‘Felony’, part of why the album was so disappointing is because it sometimes seemed that Kaabe couldn’t quite keep up to pace with the band’s heavy, fast-paced music.

‘Bohemian Grove’ starts off with a riff in the vein of bands such as Kyuss and early Cursed, but soon bursts into typical Emmure with Palmeri‘s deep, sinister vocals exploding from the hazy riff and allowing the rest of the breakdown to break into the song. A breakdown eases its way in with the lyrics “Burn down the bohemian grove / They got a secret they don’t want you to know / I can hear them screaming / Father, no”, showing a rather eerie and sinister side to the song’s theme.

‘My Name Is Thanos’ has a meaty riff and weird pinches, that make for a sound unlike any other song on the album. PalmeriEmmure should make the most of on their next album, as it really works for them. Closer ‘Word Of Intulo’ is a dark and dissonant end to the album. The lyrics “We’re all gonna fucking die” is a rather depressing statement to make, and combined with the thirty seconds of silence that follows it makes a provoking result.

Emmure have done well to write such a well-structured and ferocious album that shows they’re far from their expiry date yet, but rather just entering their prime. A must for fans of Suicide Silence, Eternal Lord and Ion Dissonance.

Written by Rhys Milsom