ALBUM: Drowning Pool – Resilience

Release Date: April 8th, 2013
Label: Eleven Seven Music
Website: www.drowningpool.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/drowningpool
Twitter: www.twitter.com/drowningpool

Rating:

One hit wonders are much rarer in the metal world than they are in the pop world. It seems that Drowning Pool are one of these rarities, they’ve never managed to capture the same success that they had with their huge single ‘Bodies’, but they’re still trying. As such, ‘Resilience’ is a fitting album title; they’ve been around for years now despite never reaching their original success. So, are Drowning Pool resilient against the test of time, or do they linger like a bad smell?

If this album is anything to go by, it’s probably the latter. Whilst their previous attempts at following 2001’s ‘Sinner’‘s success was a plain brand of alt metal with Ryan Mcombs on vocals, ‘Resilience’ ditches this sound and uses new singer Jasen Moreno to attempt a more post grunge style. The sound is very much like the heavier end of Nickleback. If the album still sounds appealing after name dropping that band, then it’s aimed towards people like you.

To put it politely, ‘Resilience’ is nothing new or ground breaking, it’s post grunge tunes about how being tough, fighting and partying and, in the essence of partying, the song ‘Saturday Night’ sounds like it could be a hard rock Ke$ha cover, with its pop like choruses and typical lyrics. It’s ridiculously unoriginal, even for post grunge.

To put it impolitely, ‘Resilience’ is just a collection of cliches. You’ll be constantly thinking of where you’ve heard lyrics like that before and eventually get bored of Drowning Pool bragging about how they’re tough guys who hate non-tough people in their lives. By the time you get to ‘Skip To The End’, you’ll want to do precisely that. You can guess what type of song ‘In Memory Of’ is just by the title. That’s right, it’s a soppy little ballad to prove that the tough guys also have feelings, when they could have done with proving that they have an original bone in their body.

Credit where credit is due, some songs like ‘One Finger And A Fist’ are catchy, but even if you turn your brain off they’re hard to take seriously. This record makes Five Finger Death Punch sound like Opeth. If you can get past all the cliches and dire lyrics, you might enjoy this album and celebrate when one of the songs is inevitably used for an episode of Monday Night Raw.

If Drowning Pool want to be more than the band that wrote ‘Bodies’, they need to create a album truly worth remembering, whereas this album barley has a memorable song. To actually be taken seriously as a band, they need to write an album with actual resilience.

Written by Jack King