ALBUM: Currents – The Place I Feel Safest

Release Date: June 16th 2017
Label: SharpTone Records
Website: www.currentsofficial.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/currentsct
Twitter: www.twitter.com/currentsct

Rating:

The 2010s have seen a mass uprising of bands blending the same elements of metalcore and electronics together. With ‘The Place I Feel Safest’, Connecticut based outfit Currents attempt to tackle this genre and prove that they’ve got what it takes to compete with their peers.

Currents have absorbed elements of bands like Northlane, In Hearts Wake, Of Mice & Men, and Issues, but also draw influence from other areas of metal’s broad spectrum, such as technical metal and djent. The album sadly, however, is flooded with the sounds of bands before them. While the Currents‘ talent is most certainly commendable and hard to dispute, their songwriting leaves something to be desired, and as a result they come across as a great example of how stale and generic metalcore has become over recent years.

This isn’t to say that ‘The Place I Feel Safest’ is a bad album; the band create great songs like ‘Tremor’, and ‘Delusion’ creates a dark soundscape underneath the harsh vocals of frontman, Brian Wille. The instrumentation is brilliantly technical and rhythmic, and the lead guitar often adds an eerie melody over the top, and, while a track like ‘Silence’ is still in the same vein overall as most of the rest of the album, it also ties in more atmospheric and calm moments throughout. It’s a track that they could easily use to their advantage to open with live, before descending into the fast-paced chaos the band has created.

Still, Currents‘ greatest downfall is how bland ‘The Place I Feel Safest’ comes across. Whilst their sound is already rather generic, the album itself doesn’t really differ between tracks, with many songs feeling the exact same. The lyrical content for each song also feels overly familiar. Nearly every song is weighed down by Wille seeming to be annoyed at an ex lover or a former friend, and with the band’s moodiness and anger not being channelled to any other topic, it’s hard to remain interested in the same story being told in several minimally different ways.

Written by Dec Sherry (@decxsherry)