EP REVIEW: Starve To Survive – Have Me To Waste

Release Date: February 15th 2019
Label: Unsigned
Website: None available
Facebook: www.facebook.com/starvetosurviveuk
Twitter: None available

Rating:

With hardcore having recently reached a creative peak that hasn’t been seen for a while, any new band that emerges on the scene is going to be judged against some tough competition. Enter Newcastle-upon-Tyne’s Starve To Survive, who are armed and ready with their second EP, ‘Have Me To Waste’.

Opener ‘Back & Forth’ gets us into first gear with its immediate nu-metal bounce, and there;s a good use of discord later on in the song, and in some others too. There’s a subtle, underlying atmosphere present as well, which is bought on by the clever use of synth lines.

Many hardcore bands have rather bluntly incorporated industrial, squealy synth lines into their work recently (the Code Orange effect if you will), so it’s somewhat refreshing to hear a less aggressive approach different approach being taken.

There’s some good uses of atmosphere that appear, namely in the EP’s title-track where it transitions very nicely from groove-laden metalcore to a washy, analogue-sounding section. When more experienced bands have recently been attempting to imitate Bring Me The Horizon poorly when they should know better, it’s nice to hear a new band who have a strong grasp of electronic elements, and know how to use them properly without it sounding disjointed.

‘Twinge’ provides more groove and bounce, with some interesting sounds appearing near the beginning of the track, and finding time for a crushing breakdown near the middle section. ‘Resolute’ is a short interlude to end the record, and relies on a brooding atmosphere that wouldn’t sound out of place on a synthwave track.

There are numerous times where it’s hard to differentiate Starve To Survive from a lot of other bands, though. ‘Dread’ is a little too close to the very mechanical deathcore formula, and there’s liberal use of all too familiar chugging patterns and grooves across the EP. If things like this were ironed out a bit, it would certainly be a more interesting listen. But, let’s remember that there’s still lots of room and time for them to grow.

Impressively at an early stage in their career, Starve To Survive have lots of ideas up their sleeve and a broad sound palette. Let’s hope they can utilise this further on a future release.