Albums/EPs

ALBUM: I Am Ghost – Those We Leave Behind

Release Date: October 7th, 2008
Label: Epitaph
Rating: 7/10

Website: www.iamghostmusic.com
MySpace: www.myspace.com/iamghost

I Am Ghost profile

With two Christian band members leaving before the recording of the record, surely California’s gothic punk group I Am Ghost should be open to writing much darker and more sinister material to suit fit their genre path. Surely enough, a more gothic feel is present on ‘Those We Leave Behind’ than there was on their debut ‘Lovers’ Requiem’, but this doesn’t necessarily mean that the band have improved since then, or even gotten worse.

Basically, to explain it as simple as possible, there’s very little difference aside from the darker undertone present within the lyrics and music. There’s nothing wrong with staying in safe territory at all once you’ve got into a position like I Am Ghost have managed, but is always important that a band progresses, adapts, or even just experiments with each continuing record. Despite the lack of change however, ‘Those We Leave Behind’ shows a band that’s passionate and knows what they’re doing when writing a record. They know who they are, and what they sound like, so the lack of change has without a shadow of a doubt pushed them forwards on the one-way musical scope they’ve set out for themselves, resulting in not brilliant, but fairly adequate gothic punk/post-hardcore record to call their own. The melodic singing and violent screaming duo battalion present on the likes of ‘Don’t Wake Up’, ‘Smile Of A Jesus Freak’, and ‘Make Me Believe This Is Real’ will push all the right buttons for most post-hardcore fans out there. Another plus side with the work is the increasingly dark nature within the band’s lyrics, such as “But it was too late, the killer’s home / And knows you well, I assume” from ‘So, I Guess This Is Goodbye’ shedding the twisted lyrical nature Steven Juliano possesses.

It goes without saying that I Am Ghost are sticking to safe ground with this one, using the ‘if it’s not broken, don’t fix it’ ethic of doing things, and though it’s a sure way of pleasing their current fanbase, it’s not the best tactic when wanting to acquire others.

Written by Zach Redrup

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ALBUM: The Hottness – Stay Classy

Release Date: April 29th, 2008
Label: Ferret Music
Rating: 8/10

Website: None available
MySpace: www.myspace.com/thehottness

The Hottness profile

With a name like The Hottness and an album cover as calm as that of ‘Stay Classy’, you wouldn’t expect this band to produce the heavy material that they do. Driving and powerful guitar riffs throughout, and battering drum lines to accompany the ‘pissed-as-fuck’ vocal work creates something that is far from classy, but that is also far from dull.

Opening with the sound of someone urinating and flushing the toilet, ‘Straight Brown’ throws you straight into the hard rock atmosphere of The Hottness. For those not too keen on all the hard vocal work don’t worry, it’s not anger every second, ‘Dearly Departed’ consists mainly of much more harmonised vocal work, but with them being a hard rock band mainstream isn’t something to expect or to receive on the agenda. The breakdown in the same track just smashes you in the face too, with so much negative energy you get just as angry feeding off from it.

‘The Ghost’ starts things a little differently to the rest of the record, bringing the listener in with notes other than hard chugging chords. The structure of the song and its sound is much more appealing to a wider audience, and just shows the capabilites of this young band. ‘Classy’ is a little piece of something different too, taking things a little slower than the rest of the album. It doesn’t quite reach the level of a James Blunt release, but is a slow-paced song for a band of this caliber.

Though their sound doesn’t derive from a fresh source or newly generated genre, The Hottness develop material that shows evidence that they’re trying to revive a deteriorating scene. The whole ‘hard rock/alternative metal’ scene has been giving birth to nothing but carbon copies of older bands in recent years, and with ‘Stay Classy’ The Hottness show promise, maybe not now, but in due time.

Written by Zach Redrup

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ALBUM: HORSE The Band – A Natural Death

Release Date: August 28th, 2007
Label: Koch Records
Rating: 6/10

Website: www.horsetheband.com
MySpace: www.myspace.com/horsetheband

HORSE The Band profile

HORSE The Band‘s inventive new genre creation of ‘Nintendocore’ is definitely an original one, and a genre they carry on as strong as ever in ‘A Natural Death’. Laced with music you’d hear when playing on your classic Game Boy, or NES console. Combined with the frantic and aggressive nature of this group’s music, and you’ve got computerised chaos.

Tracks like ‘Murder’ and ‘Face Of Bear’ are full of 8-bit sounds with the ballistic offerings from the other band members, making a riot of music and emotion, and creating a dance-like underline within the songs while Nathan Winneke‘s angst fuelled vocal work, coming across like a tyrant. The album gives rests of instrumentals before you feel too overwhelmed with the ferocity of ‘A Natural Death’, lots of listeners may need the breather it allows.

Though it’s arguable that most of the material created by the band sounds just the same as everything else they’ve done, those with the patience will be rewarded to discover that each song gives across it’s own character. ‘Kangarooster Meadows’ sticks out from the rest of the bunch like a sore thumb, edging more towards a country sound than what else you’re to find on ‘A Natural Death’, and doesn’t sound anything like HORSE The Band in any way, shape, or form.

The best moment of the album is the closing full track, ‘I Think We Are Both Suffering From The Same Crushing Metaphysical Crisis’, which charges like a freight train of force and power, with a perfect blend of hardcore brutality and subtle yet appropriate and original 8-bit Nintendo samples. It holds a rare quite and melodic bridge featured on this album, with the sentence “Time after time” sung with somewhat beauty from such an angry band. The song has so many levels and variations that if there’s only one track from this record you hear, it has to be this one.

Being pioneers of the ‘Nintendocore’ label, HORSE The Band deserve credit for creating something new and exciting in ‘A Natural Death’, and being able to pull it off so effectively too. Though a lot of their material sounds fairly similar, if you listen over a few times you’ll find something a little more.

Written by Zach Redrup

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ALBUM: Hollywood Undead – Swan Songs

Release Date: May 18th, 2009
Label: Polydor
Rating: 3/10

Website: www.hollywoodundead.com
MySpace: www.myspace.com/hollywoodundead

Hollywood Undead profile

Ahh, to be 11 again. An album three years in the making, Hollywood Undead bring you their debut full-length ‘Swan Songs’. Natural precursors to rap/metal fathers Limp Bizkit, the band have created a lengthy album of shredding, intimidating keyboards and well not exactly Sugarhill Gang-esque rhymes with riffs, and some straight-up clean singing to appease people who have moved on from ‘Chocolate Starfish…’.

The band earned over 1,000,000 MySpace plays over the course of their first nine weeks of digital genesis. This led to the band signing with MySpace Records – a deal that allegedly fell apart due to the label trying to ‘censor’ the band’s album; those bastards. Why would they stifle a band with so many important things to say, following in the footsteps of other political thought songs like ‘Nookie’ and ‘Rollin’ (Air Raid Vehicle)’?

However, I’m not going to do my usual grand sweeping statements (not lazy journalism, honestly). This isn’t a straight up Bizkit rehash, not completely anyway. They’ve modernised or varied or somethinged the formula with some catchy punk-pop, like second track ‘Sell Your Soul’, and some pop rap. However, it would be easy to change your mind with the song that comes straight after it; ‘Everywhere I Go’ having the pathetically terrible hook of “Everywhere I go, bitches always know / Charlie Scene has got a weenie that he loves to show”. Come for the beats, stay for the poetry, this one is about hoes and various despicable acts related to said hoes. Fred Durst was never quite this obvious. The opener ‘Undead’ is a more straightforward (seriously) proclomation of how good they are – with swearing. Lots of that, because that’s ill. Anyway, further along this musical odyssey other highly stimulating subjects such as Los Angeles, guns and alcohol. The avid listener would notice that these topics are fairly regularly returned to, perhaps in case we didn’t understand these complex theories of bitches and how good the band are. However, this backfires (not that it was especially working in the first place) when they do admirably attempt to rhyme (with choirs and everything) on youth violence and the doomed new generations it comes across as ridiculous when you put it in the context of the misogyny and violent threats that have preceded it. Most hilarious is the ambitiously titled ‘Paradise Lost’. I mean it is about death and looking God in the eye and all that, but Milton it certainly isn’t, but a nice try to try and switch things up albeit it at the end of the album.

Musically this isn’t particularly inspiring either. I mean, there’s some very uninventive beats in there, the same power chord at frequent intervals, and basic keyboard work with different settings on it. But at least the voices are different which you would expect and hope for in a band with six guys in. I hear that guy who’s always angry, the one who sounds vaguely like Eminem and the one who insists on using the classy auto-tune sound that everyone and their dog is using these days. In fact, with the seemingly sorrowful piano samples in ‘Young’ things are getting awfully D12-like in flavour. As I began, to be 11 again. To be honest though with you fair reader, this isn’t as much like Limp Bizkit as I lured you in to begin with. That was just to give me a journalistic hook. The truth is this is more on the rap side of the rap/rock alchemy. This in truth makes it a lot worse, I mean they attempt to reference Wu-Tang Clan in ‘Bottle And A Gun’, and then on ‘California’ they do the whole angry synth strings bit. It’s kind of ‘don’t touch what you can’t in any way dream of emulate’ territory.

Truth is, this might be fun for about between 2-10 minutes depending on your tolerance level. Otherwise this is this ‘genre’ at it’s very worst and uninspired. Let us pray for this band fulfilling their own album title’s prophecy.

Written by Paul Smith

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ALBUM: HIM – Venus Doom

Release Date: September 17th, 2007
Label: Warners
Rating: 5/10

Website: www.heartagram.com
MySpace: www.myspace.com/heartagram

HIM profile

After two years without the release of a studio album, HIM (short for His Infernal Majesty) have now released what lead singer Ville Valo claims to be the band’s heaviest piece of work to date – ‘Venus Doom’. This Finnish 5-piece are very popular for their infamous ‘heartagram’ symbol, and past single releases ‘Buried Alive By Love’, ‘Right Here In My Arms’, and ‘Solitary Man’.

Definitely one of the more heavier albums in this band’s arsenal of releases, HIM still seem to tread on familiar ground with their music. Defining their genre into one unique category – ‘love metal’, this band sound like themselves and nothing else. However with six studio albums and several demos and compilation albums, you would expect a band to progress or change their sound a little more than this. They write about love, and nothing else. Yes, this keeps in touch with their own genre, but after album number four this idea can seem a bit repetitive and boring. With song titles like ‘Dead Lovers’ Lane’, ‘Love In Cold Blood’, and ‘The Kiss Of Dawn’ you can see where this idea is coming from.

HIM and ‘Venus Doom’ are not completely dense with faults though, they do manage to do what they do well even if they do this all the time. You’ve got the classic HIM sound and haunting vocal work, crunching guitars and technical solos, lyrics about vampire hearts and crimson doors, under laying piano lines, and that extra gothic feel that makes any work by HIM complete.

‘Song Or Suicide’ is a nice interlude from the rest of the album’s tracks, a short acoustic track lasting just over a minute with low vocal work bringing the haunting gothic touch into play.

Album opener and title track is another great highlight from this album, opening the album with the sound of Ville Valo lighting and smoking his cigarette before being intruded by a heavy attack of instruments. “Watch me fall for you, my Venus Doom / Hide my heart where all dreams are entombed, my Venus Doom.” is a chorus line you’ll have stuck in your head for a while after hearing it.

Although exciting and enjoyable to listen to for the most part, this album barely ever reaches the point of no control. The closest you’ll ever get to frantic or chaotic on any track is a guitar solo from Linde, and even then the frenzy is soon over.

On the whole, ‘Venus Doom’ is a good album and is worth a listen. If you’re current HIM fans then you’ll love this album, which is just like their older work with more of a metal touch to it than usual. However, for those of you who were perhaps cautious of this band in the past, you won’t be changing your mind here. Although a fairly repetitive band, HIM do what they do well, and rarely sound like anyone else out there right now.

Written by Zach Redrup

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ALBUM: A Hero A Fake – Let Oceans Lie

Release Date: January 19th, 2010
Label: Victory Records
Rating: 8/10

Website: None available
MySpace: www.myspace.com/aheroafake

A Hero A Fake profile

Rather than slamming down a few fistfuls of heavy-as-lead beef to labour through, A Hero A Fake have instead decided to lay on a stylish banquet of 11 accessible yet technical tracks of metalcore for us all to feast on for this, their second album, ‘Let Oceans Lie’.

A Hero A Fake‘s sound lies somewhere between that of now defunct UK tech outfit SiKth, New Jersey’s Trophy Scars and the southern rock-styled five-piece that is He Is Legend. It’s a potent mix of modern post-hardcore’s smooth, energetic melodies and metalcore’s clinical punch to the belly impact. The foundations of bass and drums are as solid as you could wish for, allowing the guitarists the space to spray the eardrums with some beautiful and technical interweaving lines that create an intricate, rich web of melodic textures. The vocals work well within the overall sound thanks to some much needed restraint that other bands in this genre often fail to make use of. There’s no cringingly ridiculous vocal freak outs here, and you’re never left with the sense that the vocalists have outstayed their welcome within any of the songs. The melodic work is held together with some extremely tight rhythms and meandering, twisting song structures that fires you through section after section without overwhelming the listener.

The entire 11 track roster is consistently strong throughout, yet there are some standout moments that deserve particular attention. ‘Swallowed By The Sea’ is four and a half minutes of engrossing interplay between the melodies of the guitar and the savage beat keeping of the drums that climaxes in an almighty melee that could melt as many faces as you can throw at it. ‘Sleepstate’ sounds like a machine gun going off in a room full of pop-punk bands with the results super glued together and played until it blisters. The album’s title track sounds like the evil yet brilliant mutated half-brother of a Billy Talent song destroying a city. Curtain closer ‘A Year In Passing’ finishes off the album in a decidedly more civilised manner that manages to create some kind of farewell fanfare without turning everything an unwanted shade of cheese.

‘Let Oceans Lie’ manages to do metalcore with an accessible edge without weakening the end result. As an album it does everything you’d expect with songs that often do anything but (it even has the quintessential acoustic number on track seven!). A Hero A Fake are clearly a band able to match their ambitions and ideas with their abilities and this, their sophomore effort, is well worth checking out even if their genre usually sends you running to hills.

Written by Greg Johnson

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ALBUM: Heavy Heavy Low Low – Turtle Nipple And The Toxic Shock

Release Date: August 19th, 2008
Label: Ferret Music
Rating: 6/10

Website: None available
MySpace: www.myspace.com/heavyheavylowlow

Heavy Heavy Low Low profile

The band Heavy Heavy Low Low have never really came across as the most serious bands on the scene, in the sense that they have one of the most obscure band names to grace alternative music, and give similarly bizarre names to their songs and albums, such as their newest full-length studio album, ‘Turtle Nipple And The Toxic Shock’.

Their irradicle nature and behaviour to what they do has lost gained a lot of haters a long with many dedicated fans, some of these haters going as far as to say “they’re cancer to music”. Nevertheless, it’s hard to say with evidence that there are many other bands doing the same thing as these guys out there. Their songs are short, loud, and chaotic to put it mildly. The first proper track ‘Giant Mantis VS. Turt Nip’ pretty much bursts into their insane nature, with a timed guitar riff leading to the bombshell scream “It’s the same / It’s the same / It’s making me… smile” from the gut of lead vocalist Robert Smith. The song is then soon lead to a more funky section before another explosive moment before the end.

The loud release of ‘How Many Dad’s Must Eat Themselves?’ is a short-lived one, and is the owner of a seemingly meaningless and random track title, which can also be said for ‘R4TB3LLY’, ‘Supernova Ninja Surfers’, and ‘Rotten Church / Mall / Parking Lot’. Though this isn’t even an issue due to the experimental and irrelevance to meaning nature this band give-off in their material.

It’s criticised a lot that the band’s weakest point musically is the vocal quality and stylings of Robbie Smith, which to be fair isn’t anything near the standard you’d expect from the likes of Oliver Sykes, M Shadows, and other similar vocalists, but suits the musical style made from Heavy Heavy Low Low. Though, if anything is to put you off this record, or even this band, that would be the main point. Despite this, the vocal work has been severly improved since that of previous release ‘Everything’s Watched, Everyone’s Watching’, and with the band even claiming themselves that they were much more prepared this time and weren’t “100% ready” when recording the previous record. This statement is clearly proven by the much more polished and rehearsed sound of the songs overall on ‘Turtle Nipple And The Toxic Shock’.

If short songs lasting the average of anything from one minute to 3 minutes at the most is what floats your boat, along with random song titles and lyrical content, and music that could be heavy one minute and psychedlic the next, then Heavy Heavy Low Low should be number 1 on your ‘to hear’ list. Not the most talented band in the world, but they most certainley aren’t the most boring or overdone.

Written by Zach Redrup

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ALBUM: The Heart Attacks – Hellbound And Heartless

Release Date: October 23rd, 2006
Label: Hellcat Records
Rating: 7/10

Website: None available
MySpace: www.myspace.com/theheartattacks

The Heart Attacks profile

With a sound combining classic punk bands such as The Sex Pistols with more modern rock bands like The Glitterati, the energetic singles from this record, ‘You Oughtta’ Know By Now’ and ‘Travelin’ Band’, don’t seem too different from one another. Neither does the track ‘Fast Times Attached’, with shouting and squeals throughout, angry lyrics, and raw punk guitars.

‘Hellbound And Heartless’ is one of the stand-out tracks on the record, with more melodic, slow-paced sing-a-long verses; the “Heartless and hellbound” pre-chorus line and the “Ah-ah ah-ah” chorus will bring a hairbrush moment or two.

Joan Jett‘s guest appearance on the track ‘Tearstained Letters’ is one of the few times where there’s any recognisable variation, it’s not half as raw or punk – a suprise from The Heart Attacks to say the least.

This record tugs at your heartstrings and then smashes you in the face, definately one for fans of punk or high-pitched squeals.

Written by Zach Redrup

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ALBUM: Green Day – 21st Century Breakdown

Release Date: May 15th, 2009
Label: Reprise Records
Rating: 7/10

Website: www.greenday.com
MySpace: www.myspace.com/greenday

Green Day profile

So five years after Green Day more than slightly changed up their modus operandi with 2004’s ‘American Idiot’, we have received a second rock opera in the form of 70 minute epic ’21st Century Breakdown’. You’ll have to excuse me now as I take a brief detour down anecdotal lane to put my thoughts on this album into context.

In 2004, I remember an album coming out. People (13/14/15 year old girls and boys, I mean) who previously liked all manner of shite manufactured commercial chart ‘R’n’B’ music (sans rhythm and/or blues, naturally) suddenly started dyeing parts of their hair purple, wearing brightly coloured skinny ties and checked wrist bands for no apparent reason. Their listening habits quickly switched to the likes of Blink-182, The Offspring, New Found Glory and various other pop-punk bands that had been around a for a decent while with varying levels of success. You know, simple melodies, teen angst, all that good stuff. However, the band at the epicentre of this new found alternative listening habit of my peers was Green Day which was odd considering they were doing something entirely different with their album ‘American Idiot’. They were trying to do something grand, say things about important things bands like this aren’t supposed to. They were having chart success with the title track and even moreso with ‘Boulevard Of Broken Dreams’. Not liking this kind of music, and even moreso Green Day, for trying to play music like they’re something they’re not contributed slightly to my very angry little man phase that I’m probably still not entirely over. So with chairs thrown, pencils stabbed (unrelated to Green Day thankfully) I calmed down a little, learned of how the band were getting progressively closer to this kind of territory anyway, and every now and then enjoying the bubblegum, the likes of your ‘Basket Case’‘s and your ‘Hitchin’ A Ride’‘s. The question is: can Green Day convince me they have the credibility to pull of this kind of thing five years on?

Right, so some quick notes on the idea; it’s an ‘opera’ as I have mentioned, it is set in Detroit hence ‘Murder City’, sort of follows a couple called Christian and Gloria in George W. Bush’s America. It’s set into three ‘acts’; Heroes & Cons, Charlatans & Saints and Horseshoes and Handgrenades. Buy into this or don’t at your own discretion. First track proper, the titular song, displays a level of the dreaded and generic word maturity, as Green Day go into full U2 mode, and for the opening few songs, if not throughout the whole thing, this definitely is more pop than it is punk, but not necessarily in a bad way. How much you’ll enjoy this depends on your tastes; but you can see the fully fledged stadium rock band in full swing now. The whole concept shows the ambition that the band has to escape the stereotypes I and many others lavish them with; they’ve definitely achieved it. The band display a brand of pop-rock mixed with politics, war, love, romance and all those epic kinds of things, and in a lot of places like the sadly-not-a-Rage cover ‘Know Your Enemy’. That’s not to say they haven’t stayed true to their roots in a lot of places. They mix their new found love of piano, flute and string (maybe not the flute but a Moby reference never hurts) is melded efficiently with their three-chord bubblegum punk salvados of yore, complete with the catchy hooks and big drums.

Lyrically, many of the songs are from either or both of the characters points of view, as well as being drawn from singer Billy Joe Armstrong‘s personal life, if you look to media calls that promote this album and just general interviews with the band from history, there are some parallels, with Armstrong himself saying in a piece with Rolling Stone that “I look at Christian and Gloria, and it’s me”. And while in terms of the lyrics themselves I’ve never been a big fan of Armstrong‘s writing, songs like ‘Last Night On Earth’, a stunning love ballad, actually work quite well without any of the pretentious melodrama that both clouded the previous album and the title of the song. However, in other moments like the successive ‘East Jesus Nowhere’, a crack on religion or perhaps religious zealots, things aren’t blunt to be impactful but rather blunt to the point where it just sounds Neanderthal. Still, whilst I find myself enjoying many of the songs, both musically and lyrically, this story of Christian and Gloria I just don’t find myself getting into. For instance in the second ‘Viva La Gloria’ I like the nice gypsyish start into the punk attack transition, but I don’t really care for Gloria.

So Green Day did sort of convince me here. This will never be one of my all time favourites but I enjoy it, it’s a nice package of punk, pop, rock and dare I even say a little bit of soul too. I would perhaps even go as far to say albums like this give the band the potential to become the next U2 a few more years down the line. The thing they convinced me of is that they can very much pull off a concept album, they have the skill set to tell a story, and they are the kind of band who can do it. It’s just that on this particular occasion, the story didn’t grab me. However, the tale of Christian and Gloria will probably mean a lot to somebody, people who do forge their own opinions on things and see the world as on it’s way to it’s own destruction. For me though, this is a fun record, even if I don’t quite buy into the meaning, and a more complete one for my money than Green Day have ever put out before.

Written by Paul Smith

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ALBUM: Greeley Estates – No Rain, No Rainbow

Release Date: January 26th, 2010
Label: Tragic Hero Records
Rating: 8/10

Website: None available
MySpace: www.myspace.com/greeleyestates

Greeley Estates profile

“If it’s not broken don’t fix it” is a phrase the post-hardcore genre is all too familiar with. The genre is overcrowded with artists that have no intention of bringing something fresh and different to the table. But there are always a few exceptions to the rule, and in amongst the stereotypical screamers lay a couple of hidden gems, Greeley Estates being one of them. The Arizonian quintet, who’ve had more member changes than they have albums, have finally got a strong and sturdy line-up and this is reflected in the band’s latest release ‘No Rain, No Rainbow’.

The fourth effort from the post-hardcore rockers is an awful lot heavier than previous releases seeing the boys push their sound to extremes, at times they even border on the line of deathcore. Opener ‘Seven Hours’ along with ‘loyal.com’ are prime examples of how the five-piece have grown musically. The tracks are bursting with deep growls and screams from vocalist Ryan Zimmerman, steering clear from the clean vocals the band has heavily relied upon in the past. In fact, the only parts on this record that are actually sung are done so by guest vocalists. ‘Lying Through Your Teeth Doesn’t Count As Flossing’ featuring Beau Bokan (blessthefall) and ‘Friends Are For Never’ with Craig Mabbitt (Escape The Fate) are the only songs which sound remotely similar to the band’s backcatalogue.

The sudden change in sound and style is worlds apart from the quintet’s highly popular 2008 release ‘Go West Young Man, Let The Evil Go East’. The band won’t necessarily lose fans because of their new music, but it may take a couple of listens of the record for people to adapt to Greeley Estates‘ new found maturity and incredibly aggressive style.

‘No Rain, No Rainbow’ is a strong record from five increasingly talented musicians. Guitarists Alex Torres and Brandon Hackenson are on top form throughout the album, having created a superb mix of melodic and heavy riffs. Songs such as ‘Wolves Make Great Actors’ and ‘You’ll Never Leave Vegas Alive’ are especially good for showing off the boys’ skills. Of course, drummer Chris Julian and bassist David Ludlow also deserve recognition for their hard work, along with vocal shredding Ryan, creating sounds that you’d expect would bring his lungs out from his throat.

It will be very interesting to see what the quintet sound like on album number five. If their transition into ‘No Rain, No Rainbow’ is anything to go by then it’ll end up being heavy as hell… watch this space.

Written by Kate Rees

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