ALBUM: Deaf Havana – Meet Me Halfway, At Least

Release Date: January 19th, 2010
Label: A Wolf At Your Door Records
Website: None available
MySpace: www.myspace.com/deafhavana

Rating:

Has the UK really run so low on ideas that American imitation pop-rock has become the closest thing we have to new music? The hyper machine rallying behind Deaf Havana is growing increasingly deafening but these 11 tracks make it all sound like a big noise over nothing.

‘Meet Me Halfway, At Least’ lacks any of the much needed bite and ideas that would lift it above the blandness on offer here making for a very forgettable collection of rehashed pop-punk standards and post-hardcore clichés. Opener ‘This Town Is Ours’ sounds like every other hairspray hardcore song released since 2005. ‘Friends Like These’ kicks off with some second hand angst that feels irritatingly stale and formulaic before swan diving into a Paramore ripping chorus. ‘Ice Doesn’t Help The Uncoordinated’ and ‘You Are Beautiful’ are both hit and miss affairs that battle it out to be the album’s high point thanks to their abundant energy levels that just about pull them through in the end. As a whole the album is constantly overshadowed by a sense of nagging repetitiveness, with songs and sounds you’ll think you’ve heard a hundred times before.

Of course, Deaf Havana are very much a symptom of an old worn out bandwagon that’s losing it’s wheels rather than some pivotal cause to blame and shouldn’t be torn apart like some sacrificial lamb for our amusement. With every same-old-sounding ‘new’ band released upon this oversaturated swamp of a genre that floods the market with their overly similar sounds of what’s been before, the magic formula for success is watered down until it’s all the same weak flavourless mess.

For the moment, this stuff sends the boys and girls weak at the wallets like highly sellable, sexed up hot cakes but how long until the bubble bursts? ‘Meet Me Halfway, At Least’ edges us another derivative step closing to popping this all mighty musical blister.

Written by Greg Johnson