ALBUM: Amy Lee – Aftermath

Release Date: August 25th, 2014
Label: Amy Lee Music, Inc.
Website: www.amyleeofficial.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/amyleeofficial
Twitter: www.twitter.com/amyleeev

Rating:

Evanescence frontwoman Amy Lee has often vaguely hinted towards the idea of a solo project, but due to contractual obligations was never able to fully pursue it, until now. Her debut solo album, entitled ‘Aftermath’ (featuring Dave Eggar) may not be entirely what fans expect, as it’s the soundtrack to the film, War Story. Fans may have been expecting a record full of heart-breaking masterpieces that the slower Evanescence tracks deliver, but Lee has moved away from what is expected of her and the record does not disappoint.

Opening number, ‘Push The Button’, sees Lee use on of her own vocal runs on a loop as part of the instrumental background, demonstrating the impressive level of control Lee has always had over her voice. This dark, ethereal atmosphere really sets the tone for the album as shown by later tracks ‘Can’t Stop What’s Coming’ and ‘Lockdown’, which are among the few tracks on the album to feature a vocal performance.

What sets this record apart from Evanescence releases is the instrumental tracks designed for the film’s soundtrack. It does play nicely into Lee‘s wheelhouse though, with a dark theme running throughout with piano-led track ‘Drifter’ and the more atmospheric violin-led tracks, ‘Between Worlds’ and ‘Remember To Breathe’, which have an air of Evanescence about them but still demonstrate the new direction that Lee is heading in. Adding some diversity to the record, ‘Dark Water’ features Malika Zarra‘s vocal stylings, adding something new to the record.

The most important thing to remember about ‘Aftermath’ is that it is primarily a soundtrack to a film, so the instrumental tracks that tend to act as interludes on albums actually make up the lion share of this record and are crucial to it. Amy Lee has created a solid record in ‘Aftermath’ with impressive and creative performances throughout. It’s a different direction than fans of Evanescence will be used to, but keeps the fundamental darker atmosphere that the band are known for, and it works very well indeed.

Written by Jonathon Barlow (@Narlow1)

Founder & Editor for DEAD PRESS! | Atheist and antitheist. | Judge of the quick & the dead since 1989.

Founder & Editor for DEAD PRESS! | Atheist and antitheist. | Judge of the quick & the dead since 1989.