ALBUM: In Hearts Wake – Ark

Release Date: May 26th 2017
Label: UNFD/Rise Records
Website: www.inheartswake.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/inheartswake
Twitter: www.twitter.com/inheartswake

Rating:

Australia has been churning out band after band that has been slaying the heavy music scene for some time now, and one of Aussie’s rising stars is In Hearts Wake. Metalcore can be a stagnant genre at times, plenty of bands merge into one faceless and bland sonic mess, however, especially with ‘Ark’, the band’s fourth album, they show that they’ve carved a real niche sound for themselves.

‘Ark’ covers a lot of aural ground; the swirling turbulent riffs on ‘Nomad’ and ‘Elemental’ are juxtaposed to the band’s adept accomplishment at weaving in lighter and atmospheric elements on ‘Now’ and ‘Arrow’, and then we get In Hearts Wake‘s take on straight up metalcore heaviness on the likes of ‘Warcry’ and ‘Passage’.

No strangers to environmentalism and politics within their lyrical content, the band don’t let up with ‘Ark’. The aforementioned ‘Warcry’ features an ambient instrumental bridge, with a sample of David Attenborough over the top talking from 2006’s ‘Can We Save Planet Earth?’ They’re one of only so many bands globally making music with a conscience and voicing what they feel needs to be said, and in a world that can appear to be getting bleaker and bleaker, the band come out swinging with the heavier tracks on the record proving themselves amongst their peers.

‘Passage’ is a perfect example of this side of the group from the track’s opening. After the ambient intro of ‘Ark’, featuring the soothing sounds of the ocean and seagulls alongside just as calm and soothing synth parts, a drum beat and guitar lead the track into ‘Passage’, rife with imminence and despair. The track quickly hits into a breakdown of sorts, with “Brace for the impact” being the last line of the intro before the verse pummels into the mix, as if the tides have turned and become sheer aggression against “the ark” the band are referencing.

‘Ark’, however, isn’t just centred around the band’s beliefs; plenty of lyrical material is centred around self-worth and relationships. The tone of the record is superb, the band are tackling their views without being overly preachy about it, and through metaphors, deliver their point rather well. The instrumentation of the record is brilliantly mastered; the production on the record only amplifies this, and solidifies a sound that proves In Hearts Wake have now honed their craft.

Written by Dec Sherry (@decxsherry)

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